Feed aggregator

  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.
  • warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected 'America/Los_Angeles' for 'PST/-8.0/no DST' instead in /nfs/cristina/home1/b/brian/public_html/drupal-6.28/modules/aggregator/aggregator.pages.inc on line 259.

Oops: Google sent Pixel users a huge, useless update

ArsTechnica - Thu, 11/11/2021 - 8:03am
 Google sent Pixel users a huge, useless update

Enlarge

Sure, you probably have Android 12 on your Pixel phone by now, but what if you put it on there a second time?

That's basically what happened to a bunch of Pixel users yesterday. They had the latest Android 12 build on their device, and the phone's automatic update system prompted them to download nearly the same build through a whopping 1.8GB download. After questions on Reddit popped up, the official Google account responded to users, saying, "We're sorry for the alert you received. Not to worry, we've resolved this issue and you can disregard it."

We have no way of knowing which builds users were updated to, but the examples we've seen online all involve a Verizon build of the Pixel software going out to non-Verizon users. Devices running Android 12 with the November security update were updated to the Verizon version of that update. As far as we can tell, the differences between the normal build and the Verizon build are about what you would expect: the Verizon version contains extra code that helps the phone work on Verizon's network. The affected devices seem to include many older Pixel devices but not the brand-new Pixel 6.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Subaru shows off its first electric vehicle, the Solterra SUV

ArsTechnica - Thu, 11/11/2021 - 6:45am
Subaru Corp. Solterra electric sport utility vehicle (SUV) during an unveiling event in Tokyo, Japan, on Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021.

Enlarge / Subaru Corp. Solterra electric sport utility vehicle (SUV) during an unveiling event in Tokyo, Japan, on Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021. (credit: Toru Hanai/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

On Thursday morning in Tokyo, Subaru unveiled its first-ever battery-electric vehicle. It's an electric crossover called the Solterra, and it has been developed in partnership with Toyota alongside that brand's forthcoming EV, the bZ4x.

At the heart of the Solterra—or more accurately its core—you'll find a 71.4 kWh lithium-ion traction battery, between the axles and underneath the floor of the passenger compartment. It has been designed in both front- and all-wheel-drive variants, with either a 150 kW (201 hp) AC synchronous motor driving just the front wheels, or a pair of 80 kW (107 hp) motors, one powering each axle, for a total output of 160 kW (214 hp).

Subaru says that the FWD Solterra has a range of 329 miles (530 km) and the AWD Solterra a range of about 285 miles (460 km). However, those range estimates were generated using the WLTP test standard, which does not accurately reflect the less-energy-efficient driving style required for North American roads.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Researchers wait 12 months to report vulnerability with 9.8 out of 10 severity rating

ArsTechnica - Thu, 11/11/2021 - 6:30am
Close-up photo of police-style caution tape stretched across an out-of-focus background.

Enlarge (credit: Michael Theis / Flickr)

About 10,000 enterprise servers running Palo Alto Networks’ GlobalProtect VPN are vulnerable to a just-patched buffer overflow bug with a severity rating of 9.8 out of a possible 10.

Security firm Randori said on Wednesday that it discovered the vulnerability 12 months ago and for most of the time since has been privately using it in its red team products, which help customers test their network defenses against real-world threats. The norm among security professionals is for researchers to privately report high-severity vulnerabilities to vendors as soon as possible rather than hoarding them in secret.

Moving laterally

CVE-2021-3064, as the vulnerability is tracked, is a buffer overflow flaw that occurs when parsing user-supplied input in a fixed-length location on the stack. A proof-of-concept exploit Randori researchers developed demonstrates the considerable damage that can result.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Rad Power’s RadWagon 4: A great e-bike at a surprisingly low price

ArsTechnica - Thu, 11/11/2021 - 5:00am

Rad Power RadWagon 4
(Ars Technica may earn compensation for sales from links on this post through affiliate programs.)
The Salter household is very much a bicycling household, so when Rad Power offered me a review unit of one of its 2021 model e-bikes, I eagerly accepted. Rad offers a wide selection of models with a few important common features; all of them are powered aluminum-chassis e-bikes that retail for less than $2,000.

I tried the $1,899 RadWagon 4—a large, aggressively utilitarian, and very configurable cargo bike aimed at folks who need to haul passengers or groceries. After spending three full months with the RadWagon and putting several hundred miles on it, I'm happy to recommend it as an outstanding e-bike at a low price.

Drivetrain and integrated electronics

The RadWagon 4 uses a standard chain-drive mechanism offering seven speeds on one ring. The gears only work with muscle-driven power—the RadWagon's electric motor spins the rear wheel directly, independent of the gearing. The motor can be engaged by both a standard power assist with selectable aggressiveness, or by an auxiliary throttle grip on the right handlebar—neither method is exclusive, which turns out to be a great feature on a big cargo bike.

Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

SpaceX is beginning to get the hang of human spaceflight

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 9:05pm

Finally afforded serene skies and fair seas, SpaceX successfully launched four more astronauts for NASA on a Falcon 9 rocket Wednesday night.

Flying atop a once-used Falcon 9 first stage, the Crew Dragon spacecraft ascended into thin clouds above Kennedy Space Center and safely reached orbit. The first stage subsequently returned to Earth, landing on a drone ship. The crew—NASA astronauts Raja Chari, Tom Marshburn, and Kayla Barron, as well as European astronaut Matthias Maurer—will dock with the International Space Station on Thursday evening.

Perhaps the most notable aspect of Wednesday night's launch is that it seemed almost routine.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

White House hails vaccine mandates as number of unvaccinated drops 40%

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 5:10pm
FLORIDA, 11/09/2021: A boy gives a nurse a high-five before receiving a shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination site for children aged 5 to 11.

Enlarge / FLORIDA, 11/09/2021: A boy gives a nurse a high-five before receiving a shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination site for children aged 5 to 11. (credit: Getty | SOPA images)

The White House touted the success of COVID-19 vaccine mandates Wednesday as more of the country's unvaccinated are rolling up their sleeves.

In the last seven days, the country has averaged 300,000 first doses per day, White House COVID-19 response coordinator Jeff Zients noted in a press briefing today. The weekly total is the highest in nearly a month, Zients added.

Overall, the number of unvaccinated people eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine (people ages 12 and up) has dropped 40 percent since July. That is, the number of unvaccinated fell from about 100 million to less than 60 million.

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Watch Live: NASA’s Crew-3 mission set to launch on a Falcon 9 rocket

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 2:15pm

NASA and SpaceX had originally hoped to fly the next bunch of astronauts to the International Space Station in late October, but the Crew-3 mission has been subject to a handful of delays due to weather and health issues. But now, the mission managers say Crew-3 is ready to fly on a Falcon 9 rocket, with a liftoff set for 9:03 pm ET on Wednesday (02:03 UTC Thursday).

Four astronauts will launch inside Crew Dragon Endurance for this mission—NASA astronauts Raja Chari, Tom Marshburn, and Kayla Barron, as well as European astronaut Matthias Maurer. After docking with the space station on Thursday, the astronauts will spend about six months in orbit performing a variety of science and maintenance operations.

Weather concerns

Poor weather precluded an initial launch attempt on Halloween. Conditions at the launch site weren't bad, but flight controllers were concerned about high seas and strong winds offshore, where an extra-tropical system raged across the northern Atlantic Ocean. Had there been an emergency during the Falcon 9 rocket launch, the Crew Dragon spacecraft would have had to escape into unacceptably poor surface conditions.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Apple will no longer break Face ID on repaired iPhone 13s

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 1:16pm
The "Unable to activate Face ID" message that appears after swapping displays.

Enlarge / The "Unable to activate Face ID" message that appears after swapping displays. (credit: iFixit)

Apple says it will back off its plan to break Face ID on independently repaired iPhones. The company's often contentious relationship with the repair community was tested again when "unauthorized" iPhone 13 screen replacements started resulting in broken Face ID systems. A new report from The Verge says that Apple "will release a software update that doesn't require you to transfer the microcontroller to keep Face ID working after a screen swap."

Screen replacements are the most common smartphone repairs. Apple included a new microcontroller in the iPhone 13's display that pairs each screen with other components in the phone. As iFixit reported, if a third-party repair shop replaced the iPhone 13 display, Apple would disable the phone's Face ID system.

The repair community has started calling this part-dependency trend "serialization." Basically, each protected component reports a serial number to the OS, and the software keeps track of which serial numbers the device is supposed to have. If you swap out a part, one of the serial numbers will change, and the OS will know about it. In the case of third-party iPhone 13 screen replacements, the phone would say, "Unable to activate Face ID on this iPhone."

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

More than 1,000 Android phones found infected by creepy new spyware

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 12:56pm
More than 1,000 Android phones found infected by creepy new spyware

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images)

More than 1,000 Android users have been infected with newly discovered malware that surreptitiously records audio and video in real time, downloads files, and performs a variety of other creepy surveillance activities.

In all, researchers uncovered 23 apps that covertly installed spyware that researchers from security firm Zimperium are calling PhoneSpy. The malware offers a full-featured array of capabilities that, besides eavesdropping and document theft, also includes transmitting GPS location data, modifying Wi-Fi connections, and performing overlay attacks for harvesting passwords to Facebook, Instagram, Google, and the Kakao Talk messaging application.

“These malicious Android apps are designed to run silently in the background, constantly spying on their victims without raising any suspicion,” Zimperium researcher Aazim Yaswant wrote. “We believe the malicious actors responsible for PhoneSpy have gathered significant amounts of personal and corporate information on their victims, including private communications and photos.”

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Valve delays Steam Deck launch two months to February 2022

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 12:51pm
Sorry to anyone who expected Steam Deck to launch by the end of 2021.

Enlarge / Sorry to anyone who expected Steam Deck to launch by the end of 2021. (credit: Aurich Lawson vs DC Comics)

The Steam Deck, Valve's first "Switch-like" portable PC, has officially been delayed from its original December 2021 launch window. The company's Wednesday announcement confirmed that all orders have been "bumped two months," which means the SteamOS device will reach customers no earlier than February 2022.

"We’re sorry about this—we did our best to work around the global supply chain issues, but due to material shortages, components aren’t reaching our manufacturing facilities in time for us to meet our initial launch dates," the company wrote in an update on the Steam Deck's official store page. Though Valve's statement doesn't say which materials caused the delay, it's likely that the global chip shortage is to blame.

Valve says it still plans to fulfill purchases for all three Steam Deck models in the order they were received. The company has already updated the system's Steam store page to inform customers of new shipment estimates, and Ars Technica can confirm that a previous "Q4 2021" order is now listed as coming in "Q1 2022."

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Sen. Lindsey Graham: “I will do everything in my power” to block Biden FCC pick

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 12:41pm
Gigi Sohn speaking and gesturing with her hand while testifying at a Senate hearing.

Enlarge / Gigi Sohn testifies during a Senate committee hearing on June 21, 2012. (credit: Getty Images | Alex Wong )

Senate Republicans are planning a strong fight against President Biden's nomination of consumer advocate Gigi Sohn to the Federal Communications Commission. "I will do everything in my power to convince colleagues on both sides of the aisle to reject this extreme nominee," Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) wrote in a Twitter thread yesterday.

Sohn has a longtime career in government policy, having co-founded consumer-advocacy group Public Knowledge in 2001. In 2013, then-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler chose Sohn to serve as a counselor, and the FCC proceeded to adopt Title II common-carrier and net neutrality regulations for Internet service providers—rules that were later overturned during the Trump administration. Since leaving the FCC, Sohn has continued to push for strict regulations to protect telecom consumers.

"For over thirty years, Gigi has worked to defend and preserve the fundamental competition and innovation policies that have made broadband Internet access more ubiquitous, competitive, affordable, open, and protective of user privacy," the White House said in its announcement of Sohn's nomination on October 26.

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Physicists say they’ve finally solved the teapot effect—for real this time

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 11:51am
Dropping below the critical flow rate results in the wetting of the edge, and the telltale dribble of the teapot effect.
Dropping below the critical flow rate results in the wetting of the edge, and the telltale dribble of the teapot effect.

The dribbling of tea down the side of a teapot while pouring—known as the teapot effect—is a minor annoyance for regular tea drinkers. But for physicists around the world, it has posed a knotty theoretical problem spanning decades of research, garnering an Ig Nobel Prize along the way. We thought researchers had finally closed the book on the mystery of the teapot effect in 2019, when Dutch physicists came up with a quantitative model to accurately predict the precise flow rate for how much (or how little) a teapot will dribble as it pours.

But apparently there was still more work to be done to fill a few holes in the theory, and physicists at the Vienna University of Technology (TU-Wien) and University College London took them on. The researchers say they've finally developed a complete theoretical description for the teapot effect that captures the complex interplay of inertial, viscous, and capillary forces that collectively serve to redirect the flow of liquid when certain conditions are met. Gravity, however, proved to be less relevant; all it does is determine the flow's direction. That means you'd still get the teapot effect on the Moon, according to the authors, but not if you poured tea on board the International Space Station.

The researchers presented their theoretical calculations in a paper published in the September issue of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. And now they have announced the results of experiments they conducted to test their theoretical model. Spoiler alert: the model passed with flying colors. And while it might seem to be a trivial conundrum, the insights gained could help us better control fluid flow in, say, microfluidic devices.

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Theranos tests detected prostate-cancer marker in prostateless women

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 11:25am
Former Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes goes through security after arriving for court at the Robert F. Peckham Federal Building on September 17, 2021, in San Jose, California.

Enlarge / Former Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes goes through security after arriving for court at the Robert F. Peckham Federal Building on September 17, 2021, in San Jose, California. (credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Around 2016, Theranos’ fourth lab director, Kingshuk Das, noticed a problem. He was analyzing data from the company’s diagnostic devices when he saw results from tests for prostate-specific antigen, or PSA. PSA is used to detect prostate cancer in men, and except in rare cases, it’s not present in women’s blood. Except, here it was, appearing in women’s test results.

Das took his PSA findings to CEO Elizabeth Holmes. “Females should generally not have PSA detectable,” Das told the jury in Holmes' criminal trial yesterday. 

Yet Holmes refused to believe that Theranos’ proprietary devices could be at fault. She suggested that some of the patients whose blood was tested instead had a rare type of breast cancer, pointing to “an article or two” that showed it was possible, Das recalled. Holmes' explanation, he told jurors, “seemed implausible.”

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Ars is reviewing Amazon’s The Wheel of Time series

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 10:24am
Promotional image for upcoming streaming fantasy series.

Enlarge / The hotly anticipated Wheel of Time series debuts on November 19, 2021, on Amazon Prime. (credit: Amazon Prime)

Amazon's adaptation of The Wheel of Time series begins airing on November 19 after years of development and false starts. And as Ars Technica's resident WoT book nerds, Andrew Cunningham (that's me) and Lee Hutchinson will be here to recap the first season for you, episode by episode. We've both read Robert Jordan's (and, later, Brandon Sanderson's) 14-volume fantasy epic from end to end more than once, and it would be a shame to let such a ridiculous time investment go to waste!

The Wheel of Time series in its current iteration has been in the works since at least 2016, when Wheel of Time copyright owner (and Robert Jordan's wife and editor) Harriet McDougal teased a "cutting edge TV series" from a "major studio" in the wake of a terrible low-budget pilot that aired in the wee hours one day in early 2015. Amazon has put some serious marketing muscle behind the series, with a slow-but-steady drip of trailers and promotional images, plus a gigantic interactive page walking you through the series' main characters and some of its complex lore. Amazon has also already renewed the series for a second season.

Sprawling, multi-book series like WoT can be tough to adapt, as we learned from watching the highs and lows of HBO's Game of Thrones over its eight-year run. Plot arcs need to be streamlined, tweaked, or dropped altogether; new characters are invented while existing ones (including fan-favorites!) are skipped over; and the unlimited special effects budget of the human mind needs to be replicated using the finite capabilities of computer-generated imagery.

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Google loses appeal, faces €2.4 billion shopping antitrust fine

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 10:15am
Google loses appeal, faces €2.4 billion shopping antitrust fine

(credit: MTSOfan)

Google and the European Union are still battling it out over various product-bundling schemes across Google's empire. The latest news has to do with Google Shopping's integration with Google Search. In 2017, the EU ruled that Google Shopping's integration with Search was a violation of antitrust laws. Today, Google lost its appeal, and the court held up the €2.4 billion ($2.8 billion) fine. Google can still appeal the ruling one more time, but this time, the company would go before the European Court of Justice (ECJ), the highest court in the EU.

As in many other antitrust lawsuits that Google is facing around the world, EU regulators took issue with Google artificially promoting its own services over the competition on the search results page. Google Maps, Google Shopping, and Google Flights all automatically get premium spots above the organic search results.

Google's verticals provide Google Search results with rich, often helpful content that goes above and beyond the standard "10 blue links" interface, but there's no reason non-Google services can't also provide this data. Google often says that regulation will remove these rich results from search, but it has a whole "structured data format" that allows for rich results from non-Google sites, so the claim doesn't add up. Google regularly shows rich-result content from third-party sites today; it's just not pinned to the top of the page.

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Unity purchases Weta Digital’s visual-effects tool suite for $1.6 billion

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 9:53am
A preciousssss deal for all involved.

Enlarge / A preciousssss deal for all involved.

Unity, the company best known for its line of popular video game engines, has announced plans to purchase the tech division of the Peter Jackson-led, New Zealand-based visual-effects studio Weta Digital for $1.625 billion in cash and stock.

The acquisition means that Weta's suite of visual-effects tools, popularized in movies like Lord of the RingsAvatar, and Wonder Woman, will eventually be integrated into Unity's cloud-based workflow and made available to millions of users, the company said in a press release announcing the move. Unity will also acquire the 275 engineers that build Weta's technology and "a library of thousands of incredible assets."

The Weta visual-effects team itself will remain as a standalone entity known as WetaFX, which will still be majority-owned by Jackson. Unity expects that entity to "become Unity’s largest customer in the Media and Entertainment space." Weta Workshop, which focuses on practical effects and props, will also remain separate.

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HP takes printer troubleshooting into mixed reality for some reason

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 9:43am
HP claims using the mixed-reality service will ultimately save time.

Enlarge / HP claims using the mixed-reality service will ultimately save time. (credit: HP)

Whether a printer is out of ink or the paper is jammed, printer troubleshooting can be a pain. Now, with the "metaverse" just a head-mounted display away, printer repair can be easier. At least that's what HP is claiming with xRServices, a printer repair and support feature that uses Microsoft HoloLens 2 mixed-reality headsets.

Businesses that have a HoloLens 2 and buy HP's xRServices will be able to instantly connect to an HP engineer and ask about printer problems during "any point of their print production," HP's Monday announcement said.

The service targets companies that use HP's Industrial line of printers, the massive pieces of equipment you'll find in everything from standard offices to large warehouses. They can do things your printer at home can't, like print 6,000 sheets an hour.

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Toyota’s RAV4 Prime is a perfect plug-in hybrid for the range-anxious

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 9:24am
The $38,350 Toyota RAV4 Prime is one of the most in-demand plug-in hybrid EVs on sale today.

Enlarge / The $38,350 Toyota RAV4 Prime is one of the most in-demand plug-in hybrid EVs on sale today. (credit: Toyota)

I wouldn't say that Toyota invented the crossover. But in 1994, the company debuted the first RAV4, an SUV with off-road-capable four-wheel drive—yet built on a unibody chassis, just like a Corolla. And its bold styling and decent on-road performance did a lot to popularize this new vehicle segment.

In the years since, the RAV4 has grown. Today's RAV4 is much larger than the original two-door model from the '90s, and it's now far and away Toyota's most popular offering. Here in the US, the RAV4 has outsold the Camry and Corolla—as well as the entire Lexus brand—by tens of thousands of units this year already.

That popularity is why it has taken a surprisingly long time to arrange this review. When Toyota announced it was making a plug-in hybrid version of its bestseller, demand was so great that the company prioritized getting cars into the hands of its customers rather than the media.

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Scientists extend and straighten iconic climate “hockey stick”

ArsTechnica - Wed, 11/10/2021 - 9:00am
Image of the globe, with colors overlayered to represent temperatures.

Enlarge / The ice age climate (left) gave way to one that slowly warmed until industrial times. (credit: Matthew Osman)

The climate “hockey stick” refers to a reconstruction of temperatures over the past 1,000 years. The data shows flattish temperatures over the last millennium, like the handle of a Hockey stick, ending in a "blade" of rapidly rising temperatures since the industrial revolution. The idea first appeared in a paper by Michael Mann and Raymond Bradley of the University of Massachusetts and Malcolm Hughes of the University of Arizona. The work became famous after appearing in a UN climate report, after which it was the focus of climate denial, hacking, defamation, and disinformation, all of which was dramatized in a recent BBC TV drama called “The Trick.”

Today, in a paper published by Nature, scientists show that the "handle" of the "hockey stick" extends back 9,500 years, while its "blade" is taller—the last decade was 1.5° C hotter than the average temperature over the last 11,700 years. "Human-caused global temperature change during the last century was likely faster than any changes during the last 24,000 years," said lead author Dr. Matt Osman of the University of Arizona.

An animation showing the warming that ended the last ice age.

An animation showing the warming that ended the last ice age. (credit: Matthew Osman)

Taking the temperature of times before thermometers

To measure temperatures at times long before the invention of thermometers, scientists must use indirect proxies. For the new study, scientists carefully vetted over 500 proxy records from oceans around the world; the data shows the fossilized remains of plankton and microbes in sediments where the age is known from radiocarbon dating.

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Judge rejects Apple’s arguments for delaying ordered iOS App Store changes

ArsTechnica - Tue, 11/09/2021 - 8:43pm
iPhone home screen with the App Store icon displayed.

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | NurPhoto )

In September, US District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ruled that Apple must allow iOS developers to direct users to external content-purchasing mechanisms outside of the App Store's built-in In-App Purchases. Tuesday night, Rogers refused Apple's request to stay that ruling, setting the stage for it to go into effect December 9 pending further appeal.

In a blunt four-page ruling, Judge Rogers said Apple's motion for a stay, filed last month, is "fundamentally flawed" and "based on a selective reading of this Court’s findings and ignores all of the findings which supported the injunction, namely incipient antitrust conduct including supercompetitive commission rates resulting in extraordinarily high operating margins and which have not been correlated to the value of its intellectual property."

Apple's anti-steering provisions, which prevent app makers from telling users about alternate payment methods inside of the apps themselves, "are one of the key provisions upon which Apple has been able to successfully charge supracompetitive commissions untethered to its intellectual property," Judge Rogers writes. Those provisions depress royalty rates for Epic's Unreal Engine specifically and "in the industry generally" she continues.

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